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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

1 edition of Self-disclosure in psychotherapy and recovery found in the catalog.

Self-disclosure in psychotherapy and recovery

Gary G. Forrest

Self-disclosure in psychotherapy and recovery

by Gary G. Forrest

  • 397 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Jason Aronson in Lanham .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementGary G. Forrest
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBF697.5.S427 F67 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24574263M
ISBN 109780765707260, 9780765707284
LC Control Number2009032395

Book Description. Therapist Self-Disclosure gives clinicians professional and practical guidance on how and when to self-disclose in therapy. Chapters weave together theory, research, case studies, and applications to examine types of self-disclosure, timing, factors and dynamics of the therapeutic relationship, ethics in practice, and cultural, demographic, and vulnerability factors.   Last week we began our discussion of the value of equality within the client/therapist relationship. The primary way to behaviorally demonstrate therapist = client equality is with thoughtful self-disclosure, that is, the sharing of personal experiences, including thoughts and feelings going on in the moment, as a means to further the therapy.

Self-disclosure, in this context, refers to those behaviors that allow oneself to be suffi­ ciently revealing so as to become available for an intimate relationship. Levenson has referred to psychotherapy as the demystification of expe­ rience wherein intimacy emerges during the time that interpersonal vigilance diminishes through growing. Self-Disclosure In Psychotherapy: A Recap. Self-disclosure has been one of the most misunderstood constructs in psychotherapy. Somehow the traditional psychoanalytic notion of neutrality and anonymity along with rigid risk-management advice have dominated our thinking on the issue. It overshadows sound and proven behavioral and cognitive.

Therapist self-disclosure must be for the benefit of the client. It is the client who must engage in self-disclosure for therapy to occur, not the therapist. Therapists shouldn't engage in self-disclosure for their own benefit or therapy. Therapy is for the client, not the therapist. In some cases, therapeutic self-disclosure (TSD) may be beneficial to the relationship and may humanize the therapist, though is unlikely to be the major determinant of engagement, and risks inspiring an unhealthy sense of competition, diversion from treatment aims, or reinforcing poor boundaries.


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Self-disclosure in psychotherapy and recovery by Gary G. Forrest Download PDF EPUB FB2

Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy and Recovery includes a unique mosaic of theoretical and practical clinical information, rich case studies, research findings, and a wealth of evidence-based practice guidelines related to therapist and client self-disclosure in the psychotherapeutic encounter.

Experienced clinicians, neophyte therapists, and counselors in training will find this book Cited by: 4. Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy and Recovery by Gary G. Forrest,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy and Recovery includes a unique mosaic of theoretical and practical clinical information, rich case studies, research findings, and a wealth of evidence-based practice guidelines related to therapist and client self-disclosure in the psychotherapeutic : $ "Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy and Recovery includes a unique mosaic of theoretical and practical clinical information, rich case studies, research findings, and a wealth of evidence-based practice guidelines related to therapist and client self-disclosure in the psychotherapeutic encounter.

Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy and Recovery should be required reading for all psychotherapists and counselors. Therapists and clinicians who treat alcoholics and people with various drug problems and other addictions will especially benefit from reading this book.

Forrest writes with clarity, insight, and an incisive understanding of the therapeutic uses and management of therapist Pages:   "This is the best book on psychotherapy I have read recently--it is incredibly well written and easy to read.

Farber provides a much-needed integration of theory, research, and practice related to self-disclosure, which, he argues, is a fundamental component of the psychotherapy s: 2. Introduction.

The Self-Help Movement of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) extolls the merits of self-disclosure through the discussion of one’s history, personal beliefs, and current state of affairs. The basic premise is that through the sharing of one’s “experience, strength, and hope” the person can be helped to recover from addiction (Alcoholics Anonymous World Survey, ); such recovery.

The book's chapters explore three major areas, including the interrelationship of self-disclosure and personality as well as the role of self-disclosure in the development, maintenance, and deterioration of personal relationships, and the con tribution of self-disclosure to psychotherapy, marital therapy 5/5(1).

Self-disclosure is a process of communication by which one person reveals information about themself to another. The information can be descriptive or evaluative, and can include thoughts, feelings, aspirations, goals, failures, successes, fears, and dreams, as well as one's likes, dislikes, and favorites.

The stance on therapists’ self-disclosure varies widely based on theoretical orientation; classically trained psychoanalysts often avoid personal self-disclosure in an attempt to be a “blank.

The issue of self-disclosure in psychotherapy is one of complexity and some evolution Most discussions about the practice refer to boundary questions because self-disclosure by the therapist to. The website link I provided is my article on the same theme from 10 years ago.

I come from a more psychodynamic (non-disclosing) tradition, but agree there are both benefits and risks to self-disclosure. Done well and judiciously, i.e., not very much, a thoughtful self-disclosure can inject life into therapy and move it along.

Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy His three previous books include the coedited volume The Psychotherapy of Carl Rogers: Cases and Commentary. Farber has written articles on stress and burnout, psychological-mindedness, therapist and patient representations, career motivations of therapists, and the therapist as an attachment figure.

He 3/5(1). Intervention – Self-Disclosure can be an important intervention technique, used as a last-option method to get unwilling patients to open requires a strong professional relationship, in which the patient respects the counselor and their sobriety or clean living.

The fact that the person they look up to can be a shock, which can push patients into trying to work for their own recovery. The stance on therapists’ self-disclosure varies widely based on theoretical orientation; classically trained psychoanalysts often avoid personal self-disclosure in an attempt to be a “blank.

Buy Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy 1 by Farber, Barry A. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 2.

Self Disclosure in Psychotherapy by Barry A. Farber at Karnac Books. Drawing on empirical research as well as theory and clinical experience, Barry A. Farber provides a highly readable examination of self-disclosure by both therapists and patients. While some guidance about staff self-disclosure exists in the recovery literature (e.g.

Scottish Recovery Network, ) and some NHS Trusts are developing guidance (e.g. Dorset Wellbeing and Recovery Partnership, ), we are not aware of any specific to therapy. This book is 'must' reading for all clinicians and psychotherapy researchers."--Clara Hill, PhD, University of Maryland, College Park "Farber provides a refreshing, up-to-date review of the research on the effectiveness, purpose, benefits, advantages, and disadvantages of both patient and therapist self-disclosure.

This got me thinking about the role of therapist self-disclosure in therapy. Self-disclosure is the revelation of personal information about the therapist during session.

The clinical use of therapist self-disclosure is a highly debated topic. Some therapists air on the side of caution and take an objective stance in the room by not disclosing. Jourard (b), in his widely quoted book, Self-Disclosure: An Experimental Analysis of the Transparent Self, discusses at length the importance of self-disclosure for humanistic psychotherapy.

Group psychotherapy is another orientation that has stressed the importance of self-disclosure. Yalom states: “Group psychotherapists may–just like.Reviews the book, Self-disclosure in psychotherapy by Barry A.

Farber (see record ). At one point or another, most therapists have wondered how much their patients are telling them. In addition, self-disclosure should never be used as a response to the counselor’s emotional needs or in situations in which self-disclosure would jeopardize the quality of care to the client, Natwick emphasizes.

Self-disclosure should be regarded as a tool to engage clients and help move them toward their treatment goals.